The Old Waldorf Astoria Bar Book by Albert Stevens Crockett, 1935

by Gaz Regan · Saturday, March 14th, 2015 · CitC, gaz regan's library

 The Old Waldorf Astoria Bar Book by Albert Stevens Crockett, 1935

Old Waldorf front cover

 “[The Old-Fashioned] was brought to the Old Waldorf in the days of its ‘sit-down’ Bar, and was introduced by, or in honor of, Col. James E. Pepper, of Kentucky, proprietor of a celebrated whiskey of the period.  It was said to have been the invention of a bartender at the famous Pendennis Club in Lousiville, of which Col. Pepper was a member.”  The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, Albert Stevens Crockett, 1935.

Old Waldorf Bar

 

“The Rickey owes its name to Colonel ‘Joe’ Rickey . . . [who] had been a lobbyist in Washington, and as such used to buy drinks for members of Congress in the glamorous days before they had come to depend upon the discreet activities of gentlemen in green hats to keep them wet while they voted dry.  The drink was invented and named for him at Shoemaker’s, famous in Washington as a Congressional hangout.”  The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, by Albert Stevens Crockett, 1935.

Old Waldorf interior toast - Copy

“The Waldorf  began to fill up with recently manicured iron workers from Pittsburgh, loggers from Duluth, copper miners from Michigan, brewers from Milwaukee and St. Louis, and other gentry who thought a cotillion was something to eat, but who could sign checks with numbers on them as long as a Santa Fe freight train . . . The advent of the Waldorf-Astoria marked the partial eclipse of the famous Delmonico’s, still at 26th Street.” In the Golden Nineties, Henry Collins Brown, 1928.

Leave a Reply