Posts Tagged ‘Plymouth Gin’

101 Best New Cocktails: Bitter Stripper by Dee Allen , 399, Perth, Australia

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

See more of this year’s 101 Best New Cocktails HERE  Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

Bitter Stripper

Adapted from a recipe by Dee Allen , 399, Perth, Australia

“This drink is based on the negroni. The intention was to replicate the flavours of a negroni without using campari or a sweet vermouth, to create a clear drink.” Dee AllenBitter Stripper

40ml (1.3 oz) Plymouth Gin

15ml (.5 oz) Dolin Blanc

10ml (.3 oz) Salers Gentiane

5ml (.15 oz) Cointreau

1 orange twist, as garnish

Stir all ingredients over ice, and strain into a chilled martini glass. Zest the orange peel over the glass, twist and balance on the rim as the garnish.

gaz sez:   Weird and wonderful, is this drink.  Weird and wonderful.

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101 Best New Cocktails: Rose Colored Glasses by Daniel Dufek, Hi Hat Lounge, Milwaukee, WI.

Sunday, May 19th, 2013

See more of this year’s 101 Best New Cocktails HERE  Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

Rose Colored Glassesrose colored glasses

Adapted from a recipe by Daniel Dufek, Hi Hat Lounge, Milwaukee, WI.

“Hey gaz, seeing as you’ve already tried this drink, I figured I’d throw it in the ring for the next edition of your book.  Thanks!” Daniel Dufek.

2 lemon twists (reserve 1 for garnish)

45 ml (1.5 oz) Plymouth gin

22.5 ml (.75 oz) Noilly Prat dry vermouth

7.5 ml (.25 oz) Lapsang Souchong Syrup*

2 dashes Angostura bitters

6 drops Bittercube Lemon Tree bitters

Stir over ice and strain into chilled coupe. Add the garnish.

*Lapsang Souchong Syrup: Brew tea at normal strength.  Add an equal amount of granulated sugar.  Stir until dissolved. 

gaz sez:   I did, indeed, sample this drink.  It was a finalist cocktail at a Plymouth Gin competition, and I tried it in Chicago when I was traveling with the good folk at Pernod-Ricard USA on the Pioneers of Mixology roadshow.

The Lapsang Souchong Syrup is what really pulls this drink together, and the Plymouth provides a sturdy backbone that can easily support all the bitters here, without getting lost in the crowd.

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101 Best New Cocktails: Sencha Flip by Jason Walsh, CocktailLogic.com, Brooklyn, NY

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

See more of this year’s 101 Best New Cocktails here  Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

 Sencha Flip

Adapted from a recipe by Jason Walsh, CocktailLogic.com, Brooklyn, NY.Sencha Flip
“This cocktail was inspired by my adoration of Sencha Japanese tea. Many people use Matcha, however Sencha has more complexity and flavor so I prefer it over Matcha in certain cocktails.”  Jason Walsh.

60 ml (2 oz) Plymouth gin

45 ml (1.5 oz) Sweetened Sencha green tea (chilled)

22.5 ml (.75 oz) fresh lemon juice

1 large egg white

Dry-shake, then add a few ice cubes (not too many) and shake again. Strain into a chilled glass (I use a desert wine glass or pony) and enjoy.

gaz sez:   Sencha or Matcha?  Matcha or Sencha?  It’s one of those choices that needs a damned good ponder.  Jason called it well here!

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101 Best New Cocktails: Perfect Tickler by Carol Donovan, Intoxicatingly Fun Cocktails, Chicago, IL

Friday, April 19th, 2013

Perfect Tickler

Adapted from a recipe by Carol Donovan, Intoxicatingly Fun Cocktails, Chicago, IL.Perfect Tickler

“I tried this with different flowers, and liked it with lavender, but the rose allowed for a beautiful glittery garnish!  (I edge rose petals with edible glitter and float them on top).  With the different flowers I had to tweak the ratios.  The apple is really the only weight in the cocktail at all, so it needs to be muddled fairly well to extract fibers and juice both.

For batching, I did use rose water rather than trying to get enough of the rose from petals.

“This drink was a finalist in the Paris of the Plains cocktail competition 2012, and in the spirit of the fun I stirred it with a French tickler for the judging.  🙂  It was universally well received by attendees and I am proud of how it turned out.” Carol Donovan.

1/3 Granny Smith apple, sliced

6 edible rose petals (reserve 1 for garnish)

45 ml (1.5 oz) Plymouth gin

15 ml (.5 oz) St. Germaine

15 ml (.5 oz) Cocchi Americano

15 ml (.5 oz) fresh lime juice

1 drop absinthe, as garnish

Edible disco dust, as garnish

Muddle the apple well in mixing glass.  Add the rose petals and muddle gently.  Add ice and the remaining ingredients. Shake well and double-strain into a chilled coupe. Top with a single drop of absinthe and a glittered rose petal.

gaz sez:   If you don’t know Carol, then make it your business to meet her.  She’s delightful, crazy as a March Hare, and she has a smile that’s unmatched in the industry.  This drink is just about as complex as they come, and the layers of flavors contained within burst to life on the tongue, singing glorious arias all the way down the throat.  Nice one, Carol.

See more of this year’s 101 Best New Cocktails here  Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

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Gin is Made for Varlets

Friday, December 28th, 2012

“A dashing young yachtsman sang a dainty French melody, taught him by a peasant girl at Biarritz;  another member of the party told a story with a droll climax. All drank to the life that hurried past. Ultimately, everybody at the table became more or less heated, except Tom Ray. He was cool, contented, unflushed.
A member of the party called a waiter, then turned to Tom Ray and made this suggestion:  ‘‘I say, dear fellow, invent us a new drink.’
‘Great idea!’ said another.  ‘Make this night historical.’
‘I’ll think it over, and send you a suggestion,’ Tom Ray replied.
‘No;  we want it this minute!’

‘If you insist, I will impart to you a secret I have long cherished; I will give you a friend’s inspiration that is infinitely better than any of mine. Let me have a talk with your head-waiter.’

After that conference, a bowl of finely cracked ice was brought and three bottles of liquor—all chilled. The labels had been removed, to highten [sic] the mystery of the concoction.  Taking the bottles, one at a time, Tom Ray filled a goblet to the rim and turned the contents into the bowl of ice. Three liquors, in equal proportions.  A waiter then stirred the compound until it smoked with cold. The ice was then removed with a strainer and the drink was served in tall cocktail glasses.

‘No questions are to be asked or answered until every glass is drained,’ Tom insisted. ‘I believe you will like it.’

Every man stood to his guns.

‘Excellent!’ said they all.

‘Superb!’ commented Tom Ray.  ‘I may say this, because it is not my invention. The receipt is: Equal parts of French and Italian Vermouth and Plymouth gin !’

‘Gin?’

‘‘Yes; the juice of the juniper berry!’

‘Gin!’ exclaimed everybody present—in doubt, because the taste was completely hidden.

They never had tasted a common drink.

‘Certainly,’ replied Tom Ray, firmly. ‘What could be more appropriately associated with this wonderful club?’

‘But gin is made for varlets,’ somebody stammered.

‘By tradition, yes,’ was the answer; ‘but a drink like this is fit for the gods of Olympus.’

When an opinion was uttered by Tom Ray, the final verdict had been rendered.

‘Give it a name!’ shouted several voices when the delicate after-taste began to develop on their palates.

‘I christen it with the name of its inventor, Mr. Oliver, of the Stock Exchange,’ added Tom Ray, taking up his glass, after all the others had been refilled. ‘I name it The Oliver Cocktail!’”

On a Margin by Julius Chambers, 1884.

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101 Best New Cocktails, 2012: Bustier by Alicia Leslie and Amy Eldridge, The Ranstead Room, Philadelphia

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Bustier
Adapted from a recipe by Alicia Leslie and Amy Eldridge, The Ranstead Room, Philadelphia, PA.

“A riff on the Boulevardier, which is itself a riff on the Negroni. Pronounced the French way, it shares with its namesake a way of captivating your attention.” Alicia Leslie.

45 ml (1.5 oz) Plymouth gin

22.5 ml (.75 oz) Cocchi Americano

22.5 ml (.75 oz) St. Germain

1 dash rhubarb bitters

1 grapefruit twist, as garnish

Stir over plenty of ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Add the garnish.

gaz sez: According to my old friend Ted “Dr. Cocktail” Haigh (http://www.imbibemagazine.com/): “One amply palatable drink of that milieu, The Boulevardier, appeared in Harry’s 1927 bar guide, Barflies and Cocktails. It was the signature drink of Erskine Gwynne, expatriate writer, socialite and nephew of railroad tycoon Alfred Vanderbilt. Gwynne edited a monthly magazine, a sort of Parisian New Yorker, named The Boulevardier . . . Obviously, this is a Negroni with bourbon in lieu of gin. The Negroni, however, would not see print for another 20 years, and Americans had never heard of Campari in 1927.”

Well, you learn something every day, don’t you? Especially when Doc Cocktail is around.

The Bustier, though, is a horse of a very different color, and it doesn’t remind me of a Negroni in the least—Cocchi Americano and St Germain are a far cry from Campari and sweet vermouth. In the Bustier, though, we see Plymouth gin providing a very sturdy base, and playing the genial host to the other two ingredients, which wrestle each other on the tongue, each vying for attention. The result is one very complex potion that deserves applause. Well done, guys.

This is one of 2012’s 101 Best New Cocktails.

Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in next year’s list.

Click HERE to order 101 Best New Cocktails 2012

Click HERE to order the Annual Manual for Bartenders: 2012.

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A Strong Choice for a Martini

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

“I slid a Plymouth English Gin martini in front of August, two olives.  Not the most expensive gin but really a strong choice for a martini.  August took a sip and nodded in approval.  I poured another one for myself.”  The Last Minute by Jeff Abbott, 2012.

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