Posts Tagged ‘Pierre Ferrand’

101 Best New Cocktails: The Fruited Pig by Chad Larson, Cafe Maude at Loring, Minneapolis, MN

Sunday, April 21st, 2013

The Fruited Pig

 Adapted from a recipe by Chad Larson, Cafe Maude at Loring, Minneapolis, MN.Fruited Pig

“I was working on my opening cocktail list and I have used this spiced syrup and grapefruit combo before.  I wanted to use the Pierre Ferrand 1840 in a cocktail and this seemed like the one I wanted it in. I added the Bittermens bitters and the hops in there kicked the grapefruit notes to a higher level.  I was missing something and added the Pig’s Nose scotch and that tied the whole thing together.  I already have turned several people on to scotch who never really cared for it!  It seems like to be a gateway cocktail to enjoy scotch!” Chad Larson.

45 ml (1.5 oz) Pierre Ferrand 1840 Original Formula cognac

22.5 ml (.75 oz) Pig’s Nose scotch whisky

22.5 ml (.75 oz) fresh ruby red grapefruit juice

15 ml (.5 oz) Spiced Tea Syrup*

12 drops Bittermens Hopped Grapefruit bitters

1 grapefruit twist, as garnish

Shake vigorously over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Squeeze the twist over the drink, then add as garnish.

*Spiced Tea Syrup: Combine 1 teabag of Republic of Tea Cinnamon and Cardamom Tea and 180 ml (6 oz) boiling water in a small saucepan and steep for 30 minutes. Add 200g (1 cup) demerara sugar and heat until sugar dissolves. Cool to room temperature and store in the refrigerator.

gaz sez:  Another hybrid cocktail that calls for two base spirits, cognac and scotch in this case.  It’s a weird marriage, but it works real well in this case.  I think that it’s actually the spiced tea syrup that makes it possible for Pierre Ferrand to kiss the Pig’s Nose nicely here, and the dozen drops of Bittermens Hopped Grapefruit bitters doesn’t go unnoticed, either.  Nice work, Chad.

See more of this year’s 101 Best New Cocktails here  Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in 101 Best New Cocktails 2013 |

101 Best New Cocktails, 2012: Age of Reason by Han Shan, B-Side, New York City

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Age of Reason

Click here to subnmit a recipe for possible inclusion in next year’s Annual Manual

Adapted from a recipe by Han Shan, B-Side, New York City, NY.

“The spicy Michter’s rye is the backbone while the cognac smooths the rough edges a bit and the sweet herbaciousness of the Chartreuse(s) play off the spicy bittersweet of the Cochi, with the tiki-inspired bitters doing something alchemical that nothing else on my bar quite did to bring it all together. The lemon oil swipe gives it a brightness in the nose upon first sip and mostly stands back after that as you enjoy this (hopefully) balanced and delicious, easy-drinking, amber-colored quaff.

The drink is named for Tom Paine to recognize the coming together of French & American ingredients. I should have endeavored to find something English to put in there to really make the case but then I’ll call that one the ‘Tom Paine.’

BTW, for me, ‘generous barspoon’= about 1/4 oz. but I always have trouble nailing that with my jigger and one can use a tiny bit less or more to suit one’s tastes. The barspoon works for me. Last note is that the only way you can get one of these (or a decent Manhattan or Sidecar or whatever) at our friendly neighborhood beer-n-shot dive B-Side where I’m currently tending is to alert me ahead of time so I can bring the ingredients with me from home… which I sometimes do.” Han Shan.

60 ml (2 oz) Michter’s rye whiskey

15 ml (.5 oz) Pierre Ferrand Cognac Ambre

15 ml (.5 oz) Cochi Americano

1 generous barspoon green Chartreuse

1 generous barspoon yellow Chartreuse

10 drops Bittermens Elemakule Tiki bitters

1 lemon twist

Stir over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Run the twist around the rim of the glass, then discard.

gaz sez: The combination of straight rye whiskey and a great (really great) cognac, immediately reminds me of a Vieux Carré, but the similarity ends right there. Han made some bold moves with this drink, and they paid off well—especially in the case of the Bittermens Elemakule Tiki bitters which, on paper, make no sense. In the glass, though, they play a ukulele while the other ingredients dance like Uma Thurman and John Travolta in Pulp Fiction. It’s a drink that brings a smile to my face., NY.

“The spicy Michter’s rye is the backbone while the cognac smooths the rough edges a bit and the sweet herbaciousness of the Chartreuse(s) play off the spicy bittersweet of the Cochi, with the tiki-inspired bitters doing something alchemical that nothing else on my bar quite did to bring it all together. The lemon oil swipe gives it a brightness in the nose upon first sip and mostly stands back after that as you enjoy this (hopefully) balanced and delicious, easy-drinking, amber-colored quaff.

The drink is named for Tom Paine to recognize the coming together of French & American ingredients. I should have endeavored to find something English to put in there to really make the case but then I’ll call that one the ‘Tom Paine.’

BTW, for me, ‘generous barspoon’= about 1/4 oz. but I always have trouble nailing that with my jigger and one can use a tiny bit less or more to suit one’s tastes. The barspoon works for me. Last note is that the only way you can get one of these (or a decent Manhattan or Sidecar or whatever) at our friendly neighborhood beer-n-shot dive B-Side where I’m currently tending is to alert me ahead of time so I can bring the ingredients with me from home… which I sometimes do.” Han Shan.

60 ml (2 oz) Michter’s rye whiskey

15 ml (.5 oz) Pierre Ferrand Cognac Ambre

15 ml (.5 oz) Cochi Americano

1 generous barspoon green Chartreuse

1 generous barspoon yellow Chartreuse

10 drops Bittermens Elemakule Tiki bitters

1 lemon twist

Stir over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Run the twist around the rim of the glass, then discard.

gaz sez: The combination of straight rye whiskey and a great (really great) cognac, immediately reminds me of a Vieux Carré, but the similarity ends right there. Han made some bold moves with this drink, and they paid off well—especially in the case of the Bittermens Elemakule Tiki bitters which, on paper, make no sense. In the glass, though, they play a ukulele while the other ingredients dance like Uma Thurman and John Travolta in Pulp Fiction. It’s a drink that brings a smile to my face.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in 101 Best New Cocktails, 101 Best New Cocktails 2012 |