Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

Potent Quotables: London Has Fallen

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

london fallen

Two Guys Jogging:

“What the Hell they make you out of?”

“Bourbon and Poor Choices, Sir.”

I’m gonna use that line for sure!

You can see this clip HERE

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Potent Quotable from Rosie O’Donnell

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

“Time flies when you put bourbon on your pancakes,” said Jeanine, a character played by Rosie O’Donnell on CBS’s sitcom, “Mom”

Never a truer word spoken, huh?Rosie

MOM

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Coupling: An Old Series with a New Cocktail

Saturday, December 19th, 2015

coupling

Coupling is a  Brit-Com that ran from 200 through 2004 on BBC2 in the UK. I watch it regularly via my Hulu feed.  It’s pretty darned wonderful.

On an episode I saw recently one of the main characters, a primary school teacher with a huge drinking problem, showed up at a wake, headed straight for the drinks table, and gulped down what looked to be most of a can of beer.

Then, after checking to make sure nobody was looking, she proceeded to pour vodka into the beer can, gave it a swirl, and joined everyone else at the wake, beer/vodka can in hand.

This was a drunk-trick that I’ve never seen before, so I thought it worthy of note.

Do you know any similar tricks?  Write to me at gazregan@nullgmail.com, and let me know!

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Posted in Movies and TV Quotes, Quotes |

Tarantino Shooters

Sunday, November 22nd, 2015

In my never-ending search for unapolagetically  violent movies I recently stumbled on Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 flick, Grindhouse: Death Proof, a typical Tarantino offering complete with ultra-violence, fabulous music, campy sets, beautiful women, and more or less everything I look for when thrill-seeking on the Silver Screen.

I’m happy to report that, during the movie, there was a cool scene depicting people downing shooters, and they weren’t just any old shooters, either.

In this scene a bunch of people in a bar, including Tarantino himself, down shots of Green Chartreuse, and and after slamming his empty glass down on the table Tarantino asks his friends, “Now is that a tasty beverage or is that a tasty beverage?”

God Bless Quentin Tarantino.grindhouse

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Brandy Alexanders: Brideshead Style

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

Here’s a clip from Brideshead Revisited that shows you exactly how Brandy Alexanders should be consumed.

Brideshead

See more about Brideshead Revisited HERE

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The Foremost Expert in Jager-Bombs

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

From the movie: Focus with Will Smith and Margot Robbie.focus

He: The more you drink, the more you learn.

She: In that case I’m the foremost expert in Jager-Bombs!

gaz sez: It’s a good movie, too.

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Mindful Bartender: Politeness and Affability

Saturday, October 24th, 2015

“Politeness and affability cost nothing, and a nice perception of what is due a customer is as necessary to success in police gazette 1901 - Copythe profession as any other detail of the business.”

The New Police Gazette Bartender’s Guide, 1901

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New York Is A Fair Match For Philadelphia

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

New York Is A Fair Match For Philadelphia

“Indeed, New York is a fair match for Philadelphia as a home city since our old familiar ways have had to be changed to meet conditions created by the good souls who have exalted  the Demon Rum to the rank of Arch-Enemy of Mankind and elevated getting a drink to a social decoration.”  New York is Like This by H. I. Brock and J. W. Golinkin, 1929.

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Guests Who Violated The Custom

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Guests Who Violated The Custom

“The cocktail hour was sacred as a respite from work. Roosevelt called it the “children’s hour”; serious discussion ceased and the talk turned light and even frivolous. Guests who violated the custom were quickly made to appreciate their mistake”  Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt by H.W. Brands, 2008.

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Twain for the Price of Oon*

Friday, November 21st, 2014

SF Dramatic Chron

Often Short Of Legal Tenders

“A Washoe genius yesterday explained to us the origin of the nom de plume ‘Mark Twain.’ ‘Wall now, d’ye see,’ said our informant, ‘Mark—that is Sam, d’ye see—used to take his regular drinks at Johnny Doyle’s. Well, ‘Mark,’ that is Sam, d’ye see, used to run his face, bein’ often short of legal tenders. Well, ‘Mark,’ that is Sam, d’ye understand, always used to take two horns consecutive, one right after the other, and when he come in there and took ’em on tick, Johnny used to sing out to his barkeep, who carried a lump of chalk in his weskit pocket and kept the score, ‘mark twain,’ whereupon the barkeep would score two drinks to Sam’s account — and so it was, d’ye see, that he come to be called ‘Mark Twain.'”  San Francisco Dramatic Chronicle, February 14, 1866.

Any Beverage You Can Mentionmark twain

“I am a match for nearly any beverage you can mention except a whisky-cocktail.”  Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1852 – 1890.

 

 

*Twain for the Price of Oon is sort of a double play on words.  Twain is Middle English for Two, you see, and Oon is Middle English for One.  One of these (two quotes for the price of one) is about Mark Twain, and the other is by Mark Twain, so . . .  Oh, you get it, right?

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“The Solemnity Was Of Very Short Duration” Charles Dickens

Friday, November 14th, 2014

 

“At his second visit to America, when in Washington in February, 1868, Dickens, replying to a letter in which Irving was named, thus describes the last meeting and leave-taking to which he alludes above:

dickens

‘Your reference to my dear friend Washington Irving renews the vivid impressions reawakened in my mind at Baltimore but the other day.  I saw his fine face for the last time in that city. He came there from New York to pass a day or two with me before I went westward ; and they were made among the most memorable of my life by his delightful fancy and genial humor.

Some unknown admirer of his books and mine sent to the hotel a most enormous mint-julep, wreathed with flowers. We sat, one on either side of it, with great solemnity (it filled a respectably-sized round table), but the solemnity was of very short duration. It was quite an enchanted julep, and carried us among innumerable people and places that we both knew.

The julep held out far into the night, and my memory never saw him afterwards otherwise than as bending over it, with his straw, with an attempted air of gravity (after some anecdote involving some wonderfully droll and delicate observation of character), and then, as his eye caught mine, melting into that captivating laugh of his, which was the brightest and best I have ever heard.’”  The Life of Charles Dickens : 1812-1842, by John Forster,  1873.

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The Secret of a Good Barman

Friday, October 17th, 2014

“It is not true, for example, that the secret of a good barman is the strange concoctions he invents.  If you discount the short-lived harrys Baraberrations that unscrupulous bartenders invent in an effort to stir up a little profitable notoriety at the expense of their customers’ stomachs, there are actually few very few variations on the five possible starting points of any cocktail: gin, vodka, whiskey, cognac, and rum.  The trick is to make the classic drinks well, and to fit them to the particular taste of the individual drinker.”

Credited to Giuseppe Cipriani, creator of the Bellini, in Harry’s Bar, by Arrigio Cipriani, 1996.

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Potent Quotables: A Good Student Of Human Nature

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

A Good Student Of Human Nature

“A man in our line, to be successful, must be quick, prompt, courteous, able, a good student of human nature, a good dresser, clean, and possessing several more virtues.”  New and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Manual by Harry Johnson, 1900.

harry J

 

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Potent Quotables: The Cocktail Was Not Particularly Refreshing

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

The Cocktail Was Not Particularly Refreshing

“Despite the late addition of chopped fresh mint to a blend of melted chocolate, egg  yolk, coconut milk, rum, gin, crushed banana, and icing sugar, the cocktail was not particularly refreshing.”  Atonement  By Ian McEwan.  Random House LLC, Mar 19, 2009.

atonement

 

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Potent Quoteables: They Were Perfectly Awful

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

101BNCVoliii cover - Copy

Click on the cover to purchase your copy of the most recent volume of 101 Best New Cocktails

Click HERE to submit your recipe for a chance to be included in an upcoming list.

 They Were Perfectly Awful

“If truth be known, Franklin used to make the most terrible Martinis. I don’t drink Martinis, but everyone always said they were perfectly awful. However, people drank them with zest because he had made them.”  I Remember Hyde Park: A Final Reminiscence by Eleanor Roosevelt, McCall’s, February 1963.images0CEH7QTF

 

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Potent Quotables: A Company Of Bedraggled Roysterers

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

A Company Of Bedraggled Roysterers

“The night clubs and cabarets that are such prominent features of our hectic night life are in the main euphemistic terms for what the haymarketElegant Eighties knew as ‘dives.’  The old Tenderloin of Captain Williams’s regime was plentifully endowed with glorified replicas of Billy McGlory’s Armory Hall on Hester Street, and Owney Geohagen’s ‘Slide’ on the Bowery.  Perhaps the most notorious of the uptown joints was The Haymarket at Sixth Avenue and Thirtieth Street which used to figure in the amusement columns as a ‘Bijou of Tepsichore, ‘Soiree Dansante’.  ‘The Haymarket’ used to be raided periodically by the police.  There were no patrol wagons then, but as it was in immediate proximity to the Thirtieth Street Station House it required no great vigilance for a squad of bluecoats to escort a company of bedraggled roysterers to the hospitable shelter of Captain Williams’s caravansary.”  Valentine’s Manual of Old New York by Henry Collins Brown, 1927.

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Potent Quotables: The Conduct And Appearance Of The Bartender

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

The Conduct And Appearance Of The Bartender

“I cannot avoid, very well, offering a few more remarks regarding the conduct and appearance of the bartender, although I have touched upon the johnsonsubject quite frequently in this book.  I wish to impress on the mind of each man behind the bar, that he should look and act as neatly as possible.  Bartenders should not, as some have done, have a toothpick in their mouth, clean their fingernails while on duty, smoke, spit on the floor, or have other disgusting habits.”  New and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Manual by Harry Johnson, 1900.

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Potent Quotables: Another Drink at a New Bar

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

Under the Volcano

“For him life is always just around the corner, in the form of another drink at a new bar.”  Under the Volcano: A Novel by Malcolm Lowry, Stephen Spender.  Published by HarperCollins, 2000volcano

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Besotted And Bemused

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Besotted And Bemused

“Hundreds or thousands there are in this town of creatures thus besotted and bemused, who can no longer think, or understand, or act, and are besantmere breathing casks of drink, to whom small ale is cool and rum punch is hot, and there is no other delight or longing or desire left in life but the coolness of the one and the sweet heat and strength of the other.”  No Other Way by Walter Besant.  Published by Chatto & Windus, 1902

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Dandy Dens Of Vice

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Dandy Dens Of Vice

“There is no longer room for males to moan at bars. Millions of Carrie Nations have forged their hatchets into ice picks, have taken over these carriedandy dens of vice. He man precincts, once hushed and sacred, now ululate with girlish laughter.” Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion, 1945.

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Those Days Of Hard Drinking

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Those Days Of Hard Drinking

“I ought to say that to determine whether it is best to drink whisky, for example, at the beginning of a meal or at its conclusion—that was a hard drinkingmooted question in those days of hard drinking—Dr. Beaumont tried it out on Alexis. Drink before, is said to be the answer to this physiological question, if you drink at all. This shows foundation for the rules of the fine art of dining, preserved by tradition and the experience of mankind from the days of the Epicureans.”  Historical Collections by Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society.  Published by The Society, 1907.

 

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The Cocktail Is A Very Insidious Mixture

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

The Cocktail Is A Very Insidious Mixture

South of Heaven“The cocktail is a very insidious mixture. When once it has rippled in a ruby cascade down a throat—especially the sensitive throat of a woman—something is sure to happen.”  Messages of To-day to the Men of To-morrow by George Claude Lorimer.  Published by Hodder & Stoughton, 1896.

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One Little Cocktail Won’t Hurt You

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

One Little Cocktail Won’t Hurt You

“‘Miss, wouldn’t you like to try a cocktail?’Love is Like a Bottle of Gin

‘Oh, no, sir; I’m obliged to you. But it’s wicked to drink cocktails.’

‘Nonsense,’ was the reply. ‘It’s wicked to eat too much. One little cocktail won’t hurt you.’”  Messages of To-day to the Men of To-morrow by George Claude Lorimer.  Published by Hodder & Stoughton, 1896.

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The Cocktail May Attack Me

Saturday, March 8th, 2014

The Cocktail May Attack Me

“Oh, thou damned seductive Irishman! I deserve all the torments of Eblis—and I am suffering them all—for having trifled with that cold amber papyrusserpent with the ruby in his midst, thy Cocktail-of-the-side-talk. He is now coiled about my vitals, and yet, son of misery that I am, I have a horrible desire to swallow more of him. Tell thine erring friend what to do ere Allah blast thee for a tempter! I am now at the Al-Goddam and fear that the Cocktail may attack me at any moment.”  Papyrus: A Magazine of Individuality  Edited by Michael Manhahan, 1910.

 

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Two Large Ruby-Red Cocktails

Saturday, March 8th, 2014

Two Large Ruby-Red Cocktails

“He took a Cold Plunge, rubbed some Pepper Sauce in his Hair, drank a Quart of Hot Water, gargled a Patent Preparation warranted to kill the forty modern fablesMaroon Taste, and by that Time he was able to look at his Watch and realize that nobody in the whole World truly Loved him. He did not seem to have any keen Craving for Breakfast, so he drank two large ruby-red Cocktails, smelling like Furniture Polish, just as an Appetizer.”  Forty Modern Fables by George Ade.  Published by R. H. Russell, 1901.

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An Ardent Prohibitionist

Monday, February 24th, 2014

An Ardent Prohibitionist

“Once I landed at Shannon with a prominent Bostonian and initiated him into Gaelic coffee.  Later he told me he was an ardent Prohibitionist. I wasdelaplane afraid to confess the foundation of Irish whiskey. But he said it was the best coffee he ever had.”  Stanton Delapane’s Postcard from Shannon, San Francisco Chronicle, July 8, 1954.

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A Slight Drink Of Whiskey

Monday, February 24th, 2014

A Slight Drink Of Whiskey

“The written statement of his predecessor, Vice-President Hamlin, which Johnson preserved, was to the effect that both men rode together to the johnsonCapitol, at which time the Vice-President elect appeared quite sober, but that, on arriving at the Senate wing, he complained of nervous exhaustion and took a slight drink of whiskey to steady himself; and that this little was enough to exhibit him to the distinguished Senate audience intoxicated.”  President [Andrew] Johnson and Posterity by James Schouler.  Found in The Bookman: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Life.  Published by Dodd, Mead and Company, 1912.

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Such Conduct Should Not Be Repeated

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Such Conduct Should Not Be Repeated

Andrew Johnson, most unfortunately for himself, was intoxicated when sworn in as Vice-President of the United States . . . That he admitted his lapse at the outset is evident from the fact that he preserved the proof among his own manuscripts; and doubtless both he and his devoted wife andrew johnsonmourned the mortifying incident and resolved that such conduct should not be repeated.  .”  President [Andrew] Johnson and Posterity by James Schouler.  Found in The Bookman: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Life.  Published by Dodd, Mead and Company, 1912.

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Partakers Of Intoxicating Liquors

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

Partakers Of Intoxicating Liquors

“He declared that that night he dreamed he was in Statuary Hall at midnight, when all the statues came to life and Frances Willard (a famous 19th-century suffragist and national president of Woman’s Christian Temperance Union) . . . actually did address these men, and asked them if they would not honestly own . . . that each and every one of them who had been partakers of intoxicating liquors would have been even greater in life had they let them alone.” 

491px-Frances_Willard

Stories of Our Government Bureaus by Catherine Frances Cavanagh.  IX—Strange Stories Of The Internal Revenue Service.  Found in The Bookman: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Life.  Published by Dodd, Mead and Company, 1912.

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A Glass Of Cocktail At His Expense

Friday, February 7th, 2014

“He was extremely desirous I should enjoy a glass of cocktail at his expense; and on my declining, he appeared to have half a mind to recommence his quarrelsome behavior; but suddenly taking up his coat, he vanished . . . I mention this circumstance, because, during my entire excursion of upwards of five thousand miles in the United States, part of which journey was through so wild a country, this was the only instance in which I met anything bordering on rudeness of a personal character.”  Colonel Cunynghame’s Glimpse of The Great Western Republic. Found in Littel’s Living Age.  Published by Littell, Son and Co., 1851.

arthur

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Drinking To Live

Friday, February 7th, 2014

“Such was his addiction to wine, that he occasionally suffered its treacherous influence to obtain complete mastery of his reason; and indeed he was often heard to praise the cold and foggy climate of Holland, as the best in the world; since it was constantly necessary to repel its chilling assaults by the generous warmth of the grape-juice; adding, that no one could now accuse him of living to drink, as they had done in France, when, in fact, he was only taking medicine, and drinking to live.”  Brambletye House or Cavaliers and Roundheads: A Novel by Horace Smith.  Edition: 3.  Published by H. Colburn, 1826.

addiction to wine

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For The Sake Of The Spirit

Friday, February 7th, 2014

“The total abstainers are daily making it harder for the man who likes to take a drink in moderation. In Missouri a man cannot have a drink unless he stands up to take it. In Massachusetts he is not allowed to have any refreshment unless he sits down. In Maine, he must get down a cellar, or climb up into a cock-loft and be fed in the dark from a -flask whipped out of the pistol pocket of the bar. keeper. In Kansas, he must swear that he has glanders, or some such disease. In Iowa, he must commit perjury, and endanger his soul for the sake of the spirit; and in Nebraska, although he can get a drink by himself, it is a penitentiary offence to treat his neighbour. If this sort of thing goes much further, there will be no fun at all left in taking a drink.”  The Legends of the St. Lawrence: Told During a Cruise of the Yatch Hirondelle from Montreal to Gaspe by James MacPherson Le Moine, F.R.S.C.  Published by C.E. Holiwell, 1898.

sake of spirit

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Grapes And Grasshoppers

Friday, February 7th, 2014

 “The legend of St. Urho says [he] chased the grasshoppers out of ancient Finland, thus saving the grape crop and the jobs of Finnish vineyard workers. He did this by uttering the phrase: “Heinäsirkka, heinäsirkka, mene täältä hiiteen” (roughly translated: “Grasshopper, grasshopper, go to Hell!”). His feast is celebrated by wearing the colors Royal Purple and Nile Green. St. Urho is nearly always represented with grapes and grasshoppers as part of the picture.”  Sainturho.com

st urho

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The Greatest Bohemians Of Them All

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

“A fair test of Bohemianism would be to place a group of people about a table and let them drink for a couple of hours. At the end of that time all those who got up sober could qualify as Bohemians. This might not be a bad criterion, if it weren’t for the fact that such a test would make a number of sailors and barbers and tailors the greatest Bohemians of them all.”  The Message of Bohemia by Louis Baury.  Found in The Bookman: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Life.  Published by Dodd, Mead and Company, 1912.

bohemians

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Cocktails And Cigarettes Are Sophistications

Monday, January 20th, 2014

“’Do cocktails go with cigarettes . . . ?’

‘They’ve been known to. But, Salina, don’t profess to be shocked at cocktails,’ I protested. ‘I’ll wager that you have sipped the sugar at the bottom of toddy glasses many a day when you were in pigtails.’

‘I am not shocked. I am trying to understand. Certainly I was brought up in a land of toddies; but please don’t compare those exchanges of courtesy and reminiscence for which toddy merely gave the opportunity with the modern cocktail.’

‘I thought she would take the medical tack,’ whispered Elena.

‘Not at all,’ Maria whispered back. ‘She is making for the upper ether.’

‘Cocktails, from the stories I read, are an artificial stimulus to the appetite, and are taken by women as well as men,’ Salina went on in her Johnsonian manner.

‘Certainly.  Handed about before dinner,’ I admitted.

‘Tossed down, not drank—not a moment for wit or repartee,’ she supplemented.  ‘Of course, in a healthy state of society such an artificial stimulus would not be needed. Compared with pipes or cigars and toddies, cocktails and cigarettes are sophistications and indicate a sophisticated social state. Women were never given to pipes and toddies when I was in the world, and woman is the barometer of any stage of civilization.’

‘Both cigarettes and cocktails are brief,’ I teasingly pleaded in extenuation.”

For East Is East, And West Is West by Mary Gay Humphreys.  Found in Scribner’s Magazine.  Published by Charles Scribners Sons, 1911

east is east

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It Isn’t Easy, Being A Bartender

Saturday, January 18th, 2014

“I had one client, an English girl, who had a dressing gown that looked just like a street dress.  She would sit at the bar, and after a few drinks would pull it wide open, leaving herself stark naked underneath.  ‘Oh, Jimmie,’ she would say, ‘I am so careless.  I forgot to get dressed.’  I cannot count the times I have had to wrap that dress around her and tie it securely.  You see it isn’t easy, being a bartender.”  This Must be the Place: Memoirs of Jimmie the Barman, by Morrill Cody, 1937.

my 35 years behind bars

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Old Forty-Niners And California Pioneers

Saturday, January 18th, 2014

“Situated on the main street of the town [0f Austin, Nevada] is a drinking saloon, bearing the sign of ‘The Sazerac,’ after the famous brand of brandy of that name. This saloon was the resort of a number of choice spirits other than those kept behind the bar—old forty-niners and California pioneers for the most part—who during the long winter evenings sat around the stove, smoked their pipes, fired tobacco juice at a mark on the stovepipe, and swapped lies and other reminiscences”  The Sazerac Lying Club: A Nevada Book by Fred H. Hart, Editor Of The Austin “Reveille” State Of Nevada.  Published by Samuel Carson, 1878.

sazerac

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She Had Twins When She Started This One

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

“And now, ladies and gentlemen, I present to you one of man’s best friends.  No, it’s not the dog—It’s Jimmy Beard, father and mother of cooking in the open, harbinger of hors d’oeuvre, and creator by royal decree of the canapé.  If you do not possess his magnum opus, Cook it Outdoors or his encyclopedia, Hors d’oeuvre and Canapés, you are not properly equipped to deal with present-day existence.”  . . . Mr. Beard leads a life of splendor in a casserole near Washington Square.  He dips a vanilla bean into homogenized ink and writes me as follows:

“Dear Mr. Gaige: May I call you Mr. Gaige?

Here is the drink . . . you requested of me.  The cocktail is one that was a favorite of a great lady of long acquaintance.  You may rest assured that I will never give you her telephone number.  Years of tasting with a keen palate had given her, if possible, definite ideas of what, among other things, constituted a true ‘aperitif’ or introduction to the waltz and I believe she had twins when she started this one . . . Somehow or other after six or eight of these I find that the world is a fascinating place after all and the lady’s phone number if you must know it is Eldorado something.”  Excerpt from a letter written by James Beard about the Riveredge Cocktail.  Found in Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion, 1945.

Crosby Gaige

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Give Me Some Whisky

Friday, January 10th, 2014

“‘Do you take trade dollars at par?’ asked a stranger of a bar-keeper in a Main Street saloon this morning.

‘Certainly; take anything,’ replied the accommodating tumbler- slinger.

‘ Well, then, give me some whisky,’ said the stranger.

The bar-keeper set out the bottle and glass, and the stranger poured out and swallowed his drink, and started for the door.

‘Hold on there, where’s that trade dollar?’ said the bar-keeper.

‘ Oh, I haven’t got any trade-dollars,’ replied the stranger, ‘ I only asked if you took them at par for information.’”  The Sazerac Lying Club: A Nevada Book by Fred H. Hart, Editor Of The Austin “Reveille” State Of Nevada.  Published by Samuel Carson, 1878.

sazerac lying club

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A Bottle Of Applejack

Friday, January 10th, 2014

“In the morning all the ashtrays would be full of butts and the wastebaskets would hold piles of crumpled copy paper and empty applejack bottles.  Whenever I see a bottle of applejack I think of the Hauptmann trial.” My Ears are Bent by Joseph Mitchell

JOE MITCHELL

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I Will Never Touch Liquor Again

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

“His right hand struck the flask, and with a quick movement born of impulse he drew it from his pocket and hurled it far down the hill. As the flask vanished from view he exclaimed:  ‘May I be doubly damned if I drink more! I will never touch liquor again, so help me God!’”  Betsy Ross: A Romance of the Flag by Chauncey Crafts Hotchkiss.  Published by D. Appleton and Company, 1901.

betsy

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An Unquenchable Appetite For Life

Saturday, December 28th, 2013

“[The Queen Mother] had a considerable capacity—champagne was her favourite drink and gin and Dubonnet—but she never regarded Dubonnet as being alcoholic.  She had an unquenchable appetite for life, shall we put it that way.”  Nick Witchell, BBC’s royal correspondent, April 11, 2002.

dubonnet

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The Barkeeper’s Face

Saturday, December 28th, 2013

The Barkeeper’s Face

“You know what a Georgia cocktail is, don’t you?  Well, it’s rain-water and tanglefoot lightning. Take three fingers deep of tanglefoot and a glass full of the water. Swallow the lightning, heave the water into the barkeeper’s face, and then git up, and git before the bottle-slinging and shootin’ begins.”  Humors of the Railroad Kings: Authentic and Original Anecdotes of Prominent Railroad Men, 1872.

41pe5MlyUgL__

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San Francisco has the Only Bay in the World with an Olive in it

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

herb caenWELL, NO NEED to stagger on. Maybe “martini” simply came from Martini & Rossi Vermouth, since the early cocktail was made with Italian, rather than French vermouth. (Even the origins of “cocktail” are cloudy, although it is known that the word “coquetel” for a mixed drink was current in Bordeaux in the 18th century.) The point, if any, is that these latter-day attempts to establish San Francisco as the martini’s birthplace go along with our general reputation for constant inebriation. As Jim Murray, the L.A. wit, once observed, “San Francisco has the only bay in the world with an olive in it, ” and the average San Franciscan is thought of as the reincarnation of W. C. Fields, who said, “I always keep a supply of stimulants on hand in case I see a snake, which I also keep on hand.” The rumors that Mr. Fields is alive and drunk in Oakland may be laid to rest.” Herb Caen, San Francisco Chronicle, 5/15/1994

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The Tradition Of The Great Saloon-Keepers

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

The Tradition Of The Great Saloon-Keepers

“Jim Brincker, as a tolerant paternalist, was in the tradition of the great saloon-keepers of pre-prohibition America . . . The general esteem in which Mr. Bricker was held during the prohibition era was shared by his own employees:  the great Harry, who quit as bartender when the business slump became serious; Fred, the Alaskan veteran who succeeded Harry; Gus, the blonde German bus boy who worked up until he became chief assistant to Fred; Adolph, the bald-headed waiter who used to be a wrestler , but who turned square because he got tired of having bigger men bang his head on the floor . . .

nightclub era

[During prohibition] Jim gave a big dinner in his place for a visiting member of the Department of Justice staff from Washington.  He served Dubonnet cocktails . . . and, much later, Scotch highballs.  The guests included three prohibition agents, two wholesale bootleggers, two proprietors of other speakeasies, and two unidentified men of importance.  They agreed that Jim was ‘the greatest guy in the world,’ and who, in the circumstances, wouldn’t?”  The Night Club Era by Stanley Walker, New York:  Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1933.

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Recommend Me Something

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Recommend Me Something

“A rehearsal of ‘Red, Hot and Blue!’ was in progress.  The star of the show, Jimmy Durante, sat on a shaky chair tilted against the bare bricks in the back wall of the stage.  He looked as if he were trying to get as far away from other humans as possible.  His face was haggard.  When he took his cigar out of his big, ragged mouth his hands shook.

red hot blue

‘I can’t drink,’ he said, shivering.  ‘Only my great sense of responsibility forced me to show up at the pickle works today.  I can’t drink.  It’s alright if I take a glass of vermoot, or some red wine.  Yeh, that’s all right.  But last night I’m feeling thirsty, so I go to this joint across the street and I say to the bartender, ‘recommend me something.’ So he give me what he called an Alexander.  I had about six of these Alexanders, and I get dizzy.  When I go home I hit the bed  and it whirls around like an electric fan.  I am seasick.  I’m in an awful fix.  I want to die.”  Joseph Mitchell, My Ears are Bent, 2001.

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She Must Pay For A Cocktail

Friday, December 6th, 2013

She Must Pay For A Cocktail

“She knows she must pay for a cocktail in order to get a cocktail.  But it does not seem to occur to her that there is any general obligation to pay for the things she has had already, by any decent degree of respect or consideration.  It is true that a debt of honour  is generally associated with a gambling debt, for reasons that are obvious enough to honourable people.  And surely a debt of honour is due to the poor old lunatic who had the courage to gamble on Christina Alberta.”  The Collected works of G. K. Chesterton: Illustrated London News, 1926-1928, by G. K. Chesterton, Lawrence Clipper, 1991.

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The Reckless Teresa

Friday, December 6th, 2013

The Reckless Teresa

“The daring Teresa! the reckless Teresa! audacious as a woman, invincible as a boy; dancing, flirting, fencing, shooting, swearing, drinking, smoking, fighting Teresa!”  In the Carquinez Woods and Other Tales by Bret Harte.  Published by Houghton, Mifflin, 1896.

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The Festivals Of Bacchus

Friday, December 6th, 2013

The Festivals Of Bacchus

 “One who saw a good deal of their way of life has written that their chief vice, or debauchery, was that of drunkenness, ‘which they exercise for the most part with brandy. This they drink as liberally as the Spaniards do clear fountain water. Sometimes they buy together a pipe of wine; this they stave at the one end, and never cease drinking till they have made an end of it. Thus they celebrate the festivals of Bacchus so long as they have any money left.’”  On the Spanish Main or Some English Forays on the Isthmus of DarienWith a Description of the Buccaneers and a Short Account of Old-time Ships and Sailors by John Masefield.  Published by Methuen, 1906.

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And Verily Thus It Came To Pass

Friday, December 6th, 2013

And Verily Thus It Came To Pass

“‘I’ll give you all you ask . . . and your life shall be one long cocktail of orange blossoms, ocean beaches and Spring street.’ And verily thus it came to pass.”  Sunset, The Pacific Monthly, published by the Southern Pacific Company Passenger Dept., 1913.

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